LA Flooding:CIS Response

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Thanks to the Weather Channel for helping to raise awareness of the significance of the Louisiana Flood. CIS encourages donations to your favorite disaster relief agency, or to us directly to aid our CIS school, Friendship Capitol High School, in Baton Rouge. We have 400 students, and the faculty/staff, to help. Thank you Children Incorporated in Richmond, Virginia for seeding our LA Flood relief fund with $5,000. Click Here to learn how you can help surround these students with help for basic needs. No funds will be used for our own costs. It will all be spent on the kids and we will provide donors with a followup report.

Pass the Cap

Today we celebrate all high school students graduating from a New Orleans or Jefferson Parish school, but we especially tip our cap to those attendingĀ CIS schools- Lake Area New Tech Early College High School, Sci Academy, Joseph Clark High School, Jefferson Chamber Foundation Academy-East, and ReNEW Accelerated High School. We salute you for your perseverance and achievement.

Join Communities In Schools as we celebrate 1.5 million students across the country who have worked to overcome barriers to succeed in school this year. Get inspired by their stories, photos, and videos. Share information about the 11 million students who live in poverty and need our support. Take action to ensure these students stay in school and on the path to graduation.

 

 

Low-Income Students at Greater Risk of Dropping Out

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Low-income students, generally defined as those eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, are a majority of the US public school population. In New Orleans, 83% of public school students are low-income. And low-income students are six times more likely to drop out of school than their middle- and high-income peers, according to the Southern Education Foundation.

These numbers demonstrate both that poverty is perhaps the greatest barrier to student achievement and that the vast majority of students in New Orleans are uniquely challenged before they even enter the classroom. This underscores the need for services like those offered by Communities In Schools, where we provide wrap-around supports to combat the effects of poverty and keep kids engaged in school. By connecting students and their families with critical resources, CIS Site Coordinators alleviate the toxic stress that results from growing up in poverty, enabling students to focus on schoolwork and stay on a path toward graduation. Despite their statistically high likelihood of dropping out, 98% of the students we served last year stayed in school.

New Orleans RSD Schools to Return to OPSB by July 2018

Superintendent of Orleans Parish Public Schools Henderson Lewis, Jr., Ph.D. and Superintendent Louisiana Recovery School District Superintendent Patrick Dobard, center, shake hands with Orleans Parish School Board member John Brown, Sr., left, after a press conference at Andrew Wilson Charter School announcing the return of Orleans Parish schools to local control and the forming of a Unification Advisory Committee in New Orleans, LA on Thursday, May 12, 2016 following the passage of Louisiana Senate Bill 432 to begin the process. OPSB member Nolan Marshall, Jr., looks on second from left.  Photo by Matthew Hinton of The Advocate.
Superintendent of Orleans Parish Public Schools Henderson Lewis, Jr., Ph.D. and Superintendent Louisiana Recovery School District Superintendent Patrick Dobard, center, shake hands with Orleans Parish School Board member John Brown, Sr., left, after a press conference at Andrew Wilson Charter School announcing the return of Orleans Parish schools to local control and the forming of a Unification Advisory Committee in New Orleans, LA on Thursday, May 12, 2016 following the passage of Louisiana Senate Bill 432 to begin the process. OPSB member Nolan Marshall, Jr., looks on second from left. Photo by Matthew Hinton of The Advocate.

After unanimous passage by the Louisiana Senate and Governor John Bel Edwards’ signature, Senate Bill 432 was enacted yesterday. Under the bill, New Orleans public schools currently under control of the Recovery School District will begin a transition process back to local control under the Orleans Parish School Board, set to be completed by July 2018. There is a possible one-year extension built into the bill. A 13-member committee of key stakeholders in New Orleans public education will oversee the transition process. This will unite the many public charter schools and traditional public schools under the same local district by the end of the decade.

CIS of Greater New Orleans is excited to work with partner schools who are part of OPSB and those who are transitioning back from RSD as this transition unfolds. CIS is committed to working with all varieties of public school, where we provide needed wrap-around services for students at risk of falling behind or dropping out. We are excited to work with schools across the city and around southeast Louisiana to ensure that recent gains in student achievement are maintained and strengthened in the coming years.

Thank You, Prom Dress Drive Donors!

CIS Site Coordinator Lesley DeMartin, PLPC and CIS AmeriCorps Member Lindsey Reynolds pose in dresses they donated in front of the display of all donated dresses and coats at ReNEW Accelerated High School.
CIS Site Coordinator Lesley DeMartin, PLPC and CIS AmeriCorps Member Lindsey Reynolds pose in dresses they donated in front of the display of all donated dresses and coats at ReNEW Accelerated High School.

When we announced our Prom Dress Drive in March, we were hoping to get a few dresses to help some young ladies afford their prom. We were overwhelmed by the response, receiving more than 50 dresses and several coats for the gentlemen as well! On behalf of the students who can now attend their prom, we are so grateful for your generosity and your outpouring of excitement for this Drive! Thank you to everyone who shared or liked the post about the Drive on social media, helped spread the word directly to their friends, and especially to these wonderful donors who brought in dresses or other formalwear for the students:

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CIS is Hiring a Site Coordinator!

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Communities In Schools of Greater New Orleans, Inc. seeks a qualified social services professional to implement its evidence-proven model of integrated student services on the campus of a charter school that serves students in elementary/middle school. The Site Coordinator is responsible for planning, organizing, implementing and coordinating CIS activities and programs on the campus. The Site Coordinator interfaces with campus personnel and coordinates school functions with the CIS program and CIS administration. The Site Coordinator will provide assessments, referrals, and counseling or supportive guidance and connect numerous community service providers to the students who need them. Superior communication, organization and team building skills are required. Minimum of an LMSW or PLPC or equivalent experience as determined by Chief Program Officer is required. Full-time year-round position with benefits.

To apply, please follow these instructions. We will begin reviewing applications on Monday, May 16th. Position begins approximately July 1. No phone calls, please. Thank you for your interest and please share with anyone else who might be interested!

New Orleans On-Time Graduation Rate Up to 75.2%

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The Louisiana Department of Education announced last week that the four-year cohort graduation rate across all Orleans Parish public schools climbed to 75.2% in 2014-2015, a three-year high and an increase of 2.5% from the prior school year. Statewide, the four-year cohort graduation rate hit a record high of 77.5%. We congratulate everyone across the city and state who worked together to make these increases possible and we’re proud to have had a role in helping students stay in school and graduate on time. These numbers demonstrate the steady momentum that schools, organizations, and families have been able to create for students in our community. As State Superintendent John White put it, “Because of the hard work of students, families, and educators, thousands more young people are achieving opportunity for life after high school.”

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Caps Off to the Class of 2016!

Everyone here at Communities In Schools takes their #CapsOff to salute graduates in the class of 2016! We are immensely proud of everyone who has overcome obstacles to reach graduation, and grateful for all of you who have helped them reach this achievement. Please join us this season as we celebrate the graduates who inspire our work as part of the nation’s largest and most effective dropout prevention network. Please use the hashtag #CapsOff on social media to celebrate the grads in your life and follow the hashtag to see how others are celebrating!

Caps Off to the 1.5 Million Kids CIS Helps Stay in School!

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We are proud to be part of the national network of Communities In Schools, the largest and most effective dropout prevention network in the country. Not only is CIS the nation’s fifth largest youth-serving organization, but it is also a leader in keeping students in school so they can stay on a path toward graduation and achievement in life. The above accomplishments show the value of the CIS model in setting goals for students and keeping them engaged in their education. Please join us in taking our caps off to salute all the students working hard to stay in school and especially those who will be graduating this month.

Thank You, GiveNOLA Donors!

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Everyone here at CIS is humbled by the incredible effort and generosity of our GiveNOLA donors. Through persistence, perseverance, and dedication, 142 people have given to Communities In Schools this week, either through the GiveNOLA website, our website, sending a check, or contacting us directly to pledge. And we’re still going! At this point, CIS has received a total of $37,205, which is closing in on our total from last year despite 12 hours of significant technical difficulties on the GiveNOLA website. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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